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Tag: Chuch history (page 1 of 4)

A New Reformation?

Church historians sometimes downplay one of the key planks of the Protestant Reformation; the use of indigenous languages in Bible study, worship and disciple making. A great deal is made of the theological influence of Luther, Calvin et al, but language gets much less attention. However, the Reformation both encouraged and depended on the use of the indigenous languages of Northern Europe. The increasing number of translations of the Bible, prayer books and hymnals encouraged an increase in theological thinking which solidified the break with Rome and led to distinctive expressions…

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Why People are Leaving Church: A Look at Context

Rachel Held Evens recently wrote a piece on the CNN blog entitled Why Millenials Are Leaving the Church which gained huge readership (I lost count of how many of my Facebook contacts mentioned it) and has sparked a fair bit of debate. There have been a number of responses to Rachel’s paper including this thoughtful one by Trevin Wax and Krish Kandiah has pointed us to something he wrote on the same issue a couple of years ago. All three of these articles are worth a read and they all…

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Timeline of Bible Translations

The Wycliffe Global Alliance website has just launched a superb timeline of Bible Translation history. This is a resource which will reward both the casual visitor and the more serious student. Go on, give it a go!  

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Women and Leadership in the Church

The question of the role of women in Church leadership is one which gets a lot of airing both in Christian circles and in the wider press. However, it’s one that we rarely touch on here at Kouyanet. This is mainly because it isn’t an issue which impinges directly onto our areas of interest. However, when I came across this piece by Onesimus, I decided that I had to post a link to it. There are a couple of points of interest: it is written by an Orthodox scholar based…

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William Tyndale

There is an excellent article on William Tyndale in Knowing and Doing (the magazine of the C.S. Lewis Institute) which anyone interested in the Bible or Translation would profit from. (HT Antony Billington) Tyndale was both an able scholar (fluent  in seven languages in addition to English)  and “a conscious craftsman” with an “extraordinary gift for uniting the skill  of making sense of an original with the music of  spoken English at its best.” He succeeded in making the Greek New Testament and the Hebrew Old Testament speak in remarkably…

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Mission Out of Exile 2

The Jews longed to go back home and whilst the false prophets made them think that everything was OK, Jeremiah came along and shattered this illusion, telling them that they were in for a lifetime of exile. So the Jews sat by the rivers of Babylon and wept when they remembered Zion. I have an impression that we have a similar reaction; we like hark back to a golden age, when Spurgeon was packing in the crowds at the Metropolitan Tabernacle, Lloyd-Jones was expounding Romans in minute detail at Westminster…

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Books of The Year

What with one thing and another, I’ve not read as many books as usual this year and I’ve reviewed even fewer. But for the record; here is a list of book reviews that have appeared on Kouyanet in 2012. The Future of the Global Church The Soul Survivor Youth Bible Global Theology in Evangelical Perspective Thank God for Antidepressants I told you I haven’t written many reviews this year. Other books which I have read, which I should have reviewed include Simply Jesus – Who He Was, What He Did, Why…

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Some Thoughts on Luther

This weekend, I had the immense privilege of visiting Eisenach, a small town in Germany. Eisenach, which is just inside the former East Germany, has a number of claims to fame. It is there that JS Bach (probably my favourite classical composer) was born. But, for a Bible translator, it is supremely the location of  the Wartburg; the Castle where Martin Luther first translated the German New Testament. English speakers, if they think of him at all, tend to think of Luther as the man who kick started the reformation; but there is…

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Monasticism

The breadth and depth of monastic influence in the church can be sketched quickly by observing the lineage of attitudes and actions that have been approved by almost all Christians everywhere. If we read the Scripture in our native languages, we benefit from a tradition of biblical translation inspired by the monk Jerome (ca. 342-420). If we sing together the praises of Father, Son, and  Holy Spirit, we follow where the hymn-writing monks Gregory (ca. 540-604) and Bernard of Clairvaux led the way. If we pursue theology, we inevitably find ourselves indebted to the monks Augustine…

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The Council of Chalcedon

For the history of Christian doctrine, Chalcedon was thus vitally important in two ways. It represented a wise, careful and balanced restatement of scriptural revelation. And it also represented successfully the translation of biblical revelation into another conceptual language. Chalcedon was not Pentecost, but because its work faithfully synthesised scriptural history, the Hellenistic world could now hear “the wonders of God” in its own tongue. Because the work of Chalcedon faithfully translated scriptural teaching, the Hellenistic world could express the wonders of God in its own conceptual language. Both synthesis and translation…

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