Eddie and Sue Arthur

My Little Jog Round London

My bucket list just got shorter! On Sunday, I did something I’ve wanted to do for thirty odd years – I completed a marathon.

The London marathon is a remarkable event and I would encourage anyone to give it a go. I’ve lost count of the number of people who have said to me that they could never run a marathon, but if I can, then just about anyone can!

The day itself was remarkable. We started from Greenwich in bright sunshine, which after months of freezing temperatures was a bit of a surprise. After all of my training, I was fairly confident that I could finish the marathon – if in a rather slow time – but I was rather worried about my joints holding up. True to expectations, my knees became very painful at around 12 miles and I had to alternate five minutes of running with two of walking for a while. Sometime around 23 miles, I’d either worked through the injury or the pain killers were kicking in again and I was able to run once more – finishing with a little bit of a flourish on The Mall.

It hurt a lot, but it was great fun and I’m wondering what I can do to make it possible to run another marathon at some point (losing some weight would be a good start).

Sue and Sam turned up at three points on the course to cheer me on (though I didn’t see them on the third occasion) and the team from Samaritan’s Purse were a great encouragement too. Sue took this picture at around the half way point when I stopped to say hello.

Marathon Mile 13 500By the way, there is still time to sponsor me.

Samaritan’s Purse is an international reliefe and development organisation that works through local churches to proclaim and demonstrate the love of God amongst communities in need in 18 countries across Africa, Eastern Europe and Central Africa.

My aim is to raise £3,000 towards providing drinking water and sanitation for some of the world’s neediest people through theTurn on the Tap campaign. A few basic facts might help you understand why I see this as so important:

  • The weight of water that women in Africa and Asia carry on their heads is commonly 20kg, the same as the average UK airport luggage allowance.
  • The average person in the developing world uses 10 litres of water every day, less than what we use to flush the toilet with just once.
    1.8 million people die every year from diarrhoeal diseases (including cholera); 90% are children under 5, mostly in developing countries.
    Diarrhoea kills more children every year than AIDS, malaria and measles combined.
    In developing nations, approximately 90 percent of sewage systems are being emptied into rivers, lakes, and nearby streams that communities use for drinking water.

    The average person in the developing world uses 10 litres of water every day, less than what we use to flush the toilet with just once.

  • 1.8 million people die every year from diarrhoeal diseases (including cholera); 90% are children under 5, mostly in developing countries.
  • Diarrhoea kills more children every year than AIDS, malaria and measles combined.
  • In developing nations, approximately 90 percent of sewage systems are being emptied into rivers, lakes, and nearby streams that communities use for drinking water.

Those who know me, know that I’ve spent my adult life working to provide the marginalised people of the world access to the Scriptures and education in their mother tongue. These same people are very often the ones who don’t have clean water or basic sanitation – I hope my pounding the footpaths of High Wycombe and London will inpsire you to help me to help them.

Oh, you want to know how long I took? 5:46 – hardly a great time, but it is faster than Mo Farrah has managed so far!

 

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